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CrossBraining Staff
By CrossBraining Staff
on April 12, 2021

Universal Design for Learning is a teaching framework developed based on decades of scientific research on how humans learn. CrossBraining was built on this framework so that teachers can unlock UDL’s potential in their classroom. In this series, we will delve deep into UDL and how CrossBraining’s platform uses it to drive learning.

CrossBraining Staff
By CrossBraining Staff
on March 24, 2021

We don’t need to tell you that student engagement is important. But we can share some research-backed best practices on how to make lessons and projects more engaging.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on March 12, 2021

Many Health Science educators have found the benefit of having their students create a portfolio of their work. These portfolios generally include certifications, skills checklists, documentation of skills performed during labs, and other items demonstrating what they have learned in their program. In addition, some may require students to create a LinkedIn page to assist with their search for employment in the field. With CrossBraining, students can take this to another level by showing themselves in action and demonstrating actual performance of these skills.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on March 08, 2021

One of the challenges faced with Nursing and EMS educators right now is the limited number of students allowed in lab at one time due to COVID. In some states, the regulations require that labs only 4 to 6 students at one time. However, skills like IV insertion, intubation,and the like still require an instructor to assess and evaluate the student in person (and generally on a simulation dummy). This creates the need for more faculty, more scheduled lab times, and a higher overheard cost. CrossBraining can help alleviate these stressors.

CrossBraining Staff
By CrossBraining Staff
on March 02, 2021

Few of us grew up with video in our schools, so it can be difficult to imagine how to use it. So we thought we’d share some awesome ways that you can use video in your classroom.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on February 26, 2021

Academic Integrity now consists of six fundamental pillars: Honesty, Trust, Fairness, Respect, Responsibility, and Courage. We have discussed the first four in previous blog posts and will now discuss how they culminate in responsibility and courage. Just like the previous values, these are not just what we should expect from our students, but what we should display as faculty as well. We have a responsibility to our students to provide them with the knowledge and skills to be successful in their education and future career. We need to have courage to think outside the box and go the extra mile to make this happen. When we demonstrate this dedication to our students, they will reward us with the same.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on February 22, 2021

When the Medical Assistant program at Jackson College in Jackson, MI had to go online, the faculty were at a loss as to what to do with the numerous lab skills the students needed to learn to meet program accreditation requirements. Fortunately, the MA Program had implemented Crossbraining a few months prior, so put it fully into action.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on February 17, 2021

Whether you are teaching fully online in Winter semester or you are able to hold limited face to face labs, it is time to start getting prepared. Planning is key to ensuring your students not only learn the material presented, but are engaged in a remote environment. Here are some tips to get you started.

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on February 12, 2021

Previously, we discussed Honesty and Trust, which must be reciprocal in an effective learning environment. But Academic Integrity doesn’t just encompass the actions and behaviors of the student.  Faculty must also adhere to the fundamental values of Academic Integrity in their classroom to assist in the success of their students. This is done by setting clear expectations, incorporating impartial grading procedures, and providing students with the ability to demonstrate their knowledge in multiple modalities. “Fair, accurate and impartial evaluation plays an important role in educational processes, and fairness with respect to grading and assessment is essential to the establishment of trust between faculty and students,” states the International Center for Academic Integrity.1 Additionally, not all students learn the same way, so it is important that we as educators provide them with the opportunities to learn and demonstrate their knowledge with various methods. This differentiation allows the instructor to provide ways to learn that align with students’ readiness, interests, and learning preferences.2

Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
By Dr. Kristin Stockbridge
on February 08, 2021

Last week we discussed the pillar of Honesty in Academic Integrity. The ICAI states, “When honesty if established as a value it allows for and encourages the development of trust.”1 This week we will be discovering how trust can provide a platform for your students to flourish in their learning. Initially, when we think about trust, the first thing that comes to mind somewhat relates to our last discussion on honesty. Do I trust my students? Are they honest in their academic pursuits? But that isn’t the true basis for trust in the classroom. Instead, it is about the student trusting us as educators. Only by creating an environment of trust can we build a foundation in which students are able to learn and grow.